How did you write that, Adam Henig?

Adam Henig is back with a new book about the battle to desegregate Major League Baseball’s spring training in Florida in the Sixties. It is also the story of Dr. Ralph Wimbish, the St. Petersburg doctor and community leader who led the charge.

I asked Adam how he came to write Under One Roof: The Yankees, the Cardinals, and a Doctor’s Battle to Integrate Spring Training:

HDYWT: How did you come up with the idea for Under One Roof?

Adam: During my research on Alex Haley, who was the subject of my first book, I came across an article he wrote in 1961 for SPORT magazine, a now
defunct publication that was the precursor to Sports Illustrated. Before he was a famous author, Haley was freelancing for several noteworthy publications besides SPORT that included Reader’s Digest and Playboy. The article he penned not only ignited the idea, but became the foundation of my research.

HDYWT: How did you begin work on this project?

Adam: When I began the research for Under One Roof, I had little else besides Haley’s article—no title, no contacts, and little to go on. The central figure, Dr. Ralph Wimbish, did not even have a Wikipedia page. I began checking out books from my local library about Major League Baseball in the 1950s
and early 60s, with particular focus on the history of spring training and the integration of the sport. Also, since the event was based largely in St. Petersburg, Florida, I wanted to know as much as possible about the city, especially how African Americans were treated. This was still the Jim Crow era,
where everything remain separated between the races.

Once the research was underway, I created a list of people I wanted to interview. It consisted of either experts in the field of baseball and Florida history, or individuals who were directly connected to Dr. Ralph Wimbish. Those who I interviewed included former professional baseball players (such as Bill White and Hector Lopez) and Dr. Wimbish’s children, Ralph Jr. and Barbara.

HDYWT: How do you organize your research?

Adam: I developed a lot of shortcuts while working on my first book. For example, my notes from the books, newspaper articles, archival documents, and interview transcripts were placed in a single Microsoft Word file. This enabled me to search for a keyword when needed and it made it easier to establish the chronology of events. Also, each of the documents I used was properly cited so I would save time when compiling my endnotes.

HDYWT: What does a typical day of research/writing/promotion look like?

Adam: Since I am not a full time author, I have to prioritize ahead of time what I want to accomplish each day. When I am beginning a new project, for instance, I spend most of my reading the material I’ve gathered while taking notes and searching for additional leads. Sometimes I am able to plow through a few books and a dozen articles in a single sitting, while other days, a single article or book will consume all of my time. What I love (and often find frustrating) about being a nonfiction author is that you can never anticipate with certainty what the research might yield.

HDYWT: What are your favorite tools in your writer’s toolbox?

Adam: The best tool remains the public library. I could not write these books without the resources that the library provides. It not only offers books, but its online research database provides me access to newspapers (e.g., New York Times) and magazines that I would otherwise not be able to obtain without paying a fee. Fortunately, my local library is part of a district that has over a million items in its collection.

Bonus question: What tips can you share with our readers about independent publishing?

Adam: Shop around. Since this industry is still relatively new, the marketplace for services (i.e., cover designer, interior formatter, editor, etc.) is all over the map in terms of fees. You’ll get a quote from a cover designer for a $1,000 and then you’ll receive another, from someone who has the same credentials,
for $200. The post-production work requires a lot more time than a traditionally published author, but, as scores, if not hundreds of authors have experienced, the financial rewards have the potential to be so much greater since the royalties are more to your advantage.

Advertisements

One comment

  1. Reblogged this on Adam Henig and commented:
    Last month, Elizabeth McCullough of “How Did You Write That” interviewed me about my new book, “Under One Roof: The Yankees, the Cardinals, and a Doctor’s Battle to Integrate Spring Training.”

    Below is the interview transcript, where I discussed how I came up with the idea to write “Under One Roof,” the research behind it, and a tip for independently published authors. Enjoy. -AH

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s